satoriSatori Resources, Inc is a Canadian junior mining company that has newly entered the marijuana industry. While it continues to explore mineral properties, the company has recently started to consider and form partnerships for the growing and cultivation of medicinal cannabis.

The history of Satori Resources began with St. Eugene Mining Corporation Limited, its predecessor company. When St. Eugene Mining was acquired in 2012 by Claude Resources, Inc, Satori was created as a spin-off company.

Today, Satori Resources is traded in the TSX Venture Exchange under the symbol BUD. Its market cap is at CAD 1.47 M.

Among the company’s recent developments are the partnerships it has formed this year in the medical marijuana sector. In April, it partnered up with Jourdan Resources, Inc to test and develop rock phosphate as a plant fertilizer, especially for medical marijuana. The company also has an exclusive agreement with Homegrown Hydroponics, a cultivation company, to develop and distribute marijuana-growing products.

To top these off, Satori Resources appointed Bill Christie, a licensed cannabis grower, as the company’s Communications and Marketing Head. As such, Christie is tasked with establishing Satori’s presence in the cannabis industry through online channels, among others.

Meanwhile, for its mineral exploration, Satori holds 100% interest in the Tartan Lake Gold Mine Project, in a Manitoba region called Flin Flon Greenstone Belt. This historic gold mine is noted for producing 45,000 ounces of gold in the 1987-1989 period. After that, it was shut down due to the unfavorable economy, then passed through several companies until Satori acquired it in 2012. According to a recent estimate, the resource still has 130,000 ounces of gold.

The top executives at Satori Resources, Inc are CEO and President Walter C. Henry, Executive Chair Jennifer L. Boyle, CFO Jeffrey Keith Kilborn, and Advisor Scott Walters.


Yahoo! Finance: BUD News

Latest Financial News for BUD

U.S. court rules partially in favour of Molson in ad row with Bud Light

In February, Anheuser Busch aired a one-minute Bud Light commercial during the National Football League's Super Bowl championship game that taunted Molson Coors for adding corn syrup, a sweetener, to its Miller Lite and Coors Light brews. Federal court judge William Conley of the Western District of Wisconsin ruled partially in favour of Molson Coors in a lawsuit against Anheuser Busch for false advertising and misuse of the Miller and Coors trademarks.

U.S. court rules partially in favor of Molson in ad row with Bud Light

A U.S. court on Friday barred Anheuser Busch InBev NV, the world's largest beer maker and brewer of Budweiser brand beers, from using parts of its marketing that said rival Molson Coors Brewing Co's MillerCoors used corn syrup in the production of its light beers. In February, Anheuser Busch aired a one-minute Bud Light commercial during the National Football League's Super Bowl championship game that taunted Molson Coors for adding corn syrup, a sweetener, to its Miller Lite and Coors Light brews.

Judge: Anheuser-Busch must pull some ads about MillerCoors

A Wisconsin judge has ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop suggesting in advertising that MillerCoors' light beers contain corn syrup, wading into a fight between two beer giants that are losing market share to small independent brewers. U.S. District Judge William Conley for the Western District of Wisconsin on Friday granted a preliminary injunction sought by MillerCoors that temporarily stops Anheuser-Busch from using the words "corn syrup" in ads without giving more context. MillerCoors sued its rival in March, saying St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch has spent as much as $30 million on a "false and misleading" campaign, including $13 million in its first commercials during this year's Super Bowl.

U.S. court rules in favor of MillerCoors in a sour fight with rival Bud Light

A U.S. court on Friday barred Anheuser Busch InBev NV, the maker of Bud Light beer, from using marketing that suggested rival Molson Coors Brewing Co's MillerCoors used corn syrup, a sweetener, in the final production of its light beers. The ruling follows a controversial one-minute Bud Light commercial aired during the National Football League championship game in February, that shamed Molson Coors for its Miller Lite and Coors Light brews containing corn syrup.

Inside the numbers: New report shows why beer is good for Missouri

New study shows the beer industry contributes $10.2B annually to the state while supporting more than 55,000 jobs